YOUTH REPORT: Opinions On Top Issues Facing America Vary According to Race

vote-or-die

 

NATIONAL REPORT – A recent research project by GenForward reveals that opinions regarding how young Americans think about issues facing the country vary based on racial and ethnic backgrounds.

The survey study claims to be the first of its kind that polls more than 1,750 young people ages 18-30 monthly with a special emphasis on how race and ethnicity shape how they experience and think about the world.

According to GenForward, young Americans of all races have education and the economy at the top of their list of national priorities. But that’s where the similarities end.

On issues related to immigration, foreign policy and guns the is often a sharp divide between races.

Other key findings in the survey results include:

 

  • Any talk of a monolithic youth vote is uninformed.  There are vast differences in who young adults plan to vote for in November based on race and ethnicity

 

  • The Clinton campaign has work to do to motivate the young African Americans, Latino/as, Asian Americans, and Whites who helped Barack Obama form a winning coalition in 2008 and 2012

 

  • Hillary Clinton is perceived as dishonest by nearly a majority of all young adults: 48% of African Americans, 57% of Asian Americans, 64% of Latino/as, and 82% of Whites believe that Hillary Clinton is not honest and trustworthy

 

  • There are also large racial differences in the issues that matter to how young people plan to vote. For example, 30% of Latinos rate immigration as one of the three most important issues to them in choosing which candidate to support, much higher than any other racial group. Among African Americans, 21% rate police brutality as one of the three most important issues to them

 

  •  There continues to be a deep divide between young African Americans and Whites in views about race and racism in America.  For example, 80% of African Americans believe that racism remains a major problem, while only 54% of Whites agree

 

Learn more by visiting GenForward.